Finalizing your spring class schedule - check these courses out

Finalizing your spring class schedule - check these courses out  
Repeats every day until Sat Dec 08 2012 .
Tuesday, December 4, 2012 - 10:00am
Wednesday, December 5, 2012 - 10:00am
Thursday, December 6, 2012 - 10:00am
Friday, December 7, 2012 - 10:00am

all over campus

You don't want to miss out on these amazing courses offered by the Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies:

HBRJD-UA.19: Sex, Gender, and the Bible Only 5 spaces left! Feldman MW 12:30pm-1:45pm; GCASL 383

This course investigates the constitution of male and female -- both human and divine -- in the Hebrew Bible through close readings of selected biblical texts. We probe the difference between biblical gender roles and their analogues in the Greco-Christian tradition and its 20th-century heir – Freudian psychoanalysis. We also ask what light biblical views on sexual difference can shed on contemporary feminist demands for equal-rights.

HBRJD-UA.29: Israeli Music: Contesting National Culture - NEW!  This course will not be offered regularly. Dardashti, Galeet (Fellow, Taub Center for Israel Studies) TR 12:30pm-1:45pm; KJCC 109

This course examines changes in Israeli identity and politics through the lens of Israeli pop music--from the country's Zionist routes to the contemporary period.  A cultural “reading” of new and old forms of Israeli music—Mizrahi (Middle Eastern Jewish)-infused pop music, Israeli rock, Palestinian hip hop, Arab fusion, and religious pop music—can point us toward historical and current contestations of Israeli identity. 

HBRJD-UA.85: Global Jewish Communities: New York - NEW!  This course will not be offered regularly. Polland, Annie (VP for Education, Jewish Tenement Museum) MW 9:30am-10:45am; 14 UP Conf

This course will explore the history of the Jews in New York City, in its own terms and in the context of global Jewish migrations and settlements of other cities in other countries. It will focus on at one and same time on how New York transformed the Jews who settled there and how the Jews left their mark on the city and its political, economic, and cultural landscape.  We will look at the ways in New York as the premier city in the United States for the Jews, in terms of numbers, percentages, and national and international dissemination, not only changed the cultural practices of the millions of Jews who lived there, but how the behavior of the Jews left its impress on the many other New Yorkers of a wider range of ethnic and racial backgrounds.

HBRJD-UA.107: A Book Forged in Hell: Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise and the Birth of Modern Judaism Gottlieb MW 2:00pm-3:15pm; 14UP Conf

Spinoza’s 1677 Theological-Political Treatise is often considered one of the most important attacks on Judaism. But, paradoxically, it also spurred the development of modern Jewish religious thought. In this course we will explore Spinoza’s incendiary Treatise and its impact on modern Judaism.

HBRJD-UA.117: Jewish Ethics Only 8 spaces left! Rubenstein R 9:30am-12:00pm; 7 E.12th LL27

Surveys Jewish ethical perspectives on leading moral issues, including capital punishment; business ethics; self-sacrifice, martyrdom and suicide; truth and lying; the just war; abortion; euthanasia; birth control; and politics. Explores philosophical questions concerning the nature of ethics and methodological issues related to the use of Jewish sources. Examines classical Jewish texts (Bible, Talmud) and surveys Jewish ethical perspectives on leading moral issues, including capital punishment; business ethics; self-sacrifice, martyrdom and suicide; truth and lying; the just war; abortion; euthanasia; birth control; and politics. Explores philosophical questions concerning the nature of ethics and methodological issues related to the use of Jewish sources. Examines classical Jewish texts (Bible, Talmud, and medieval codes) pertaining to ethical issues and discusses the range of ethical positions that may be based on the sources.

HBRJD-UA.127: The Oldest Diplomacy: How International Relations Shaped the Ancient Near East  Fleming MW 9:30am-10:45am; BOBS LL149

The ancient Near East includes the world from Babylonia to the edges of Egypt, a region that gave us the two oldest writing systems in the world and the first explosion of cities and their civilizations. Its history can be overwhelming. Instead of attempting to address every aspect of this universe in detail, this course enters the history of the Near East through its international relations. The course will work from a single principal text and then probe that material through reading and discussion of other bibliography and primary evidence.

HBRJD-UA.181: Ethnicity in the Jewish People in the State of Israel Ariel TR 9:30am-10:45am; KIMM 808

Examines the interactions and relationships between the various Jewish ethnic groups in Israel: communities from the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe. The roots of ethnic identity are discussed, and the influences of modernization and nationalism are examined. Issues studied include the Zionist movement’s attitudes toward “negation of the diaspora,” the “melting-pot” approach to immigrant absorption during the 1950s and 1960s, the Sephardic protest, the identity struggle, ethnic politics and the emergence of the Shas Party, and the Russian and Ethiopian immigrations.

HBRJD-UA.664: Modern Yiddish Literature and Culture  Estraikh MW 12:30pm-1:45pm; GODD B02

This course is an introduction to the literary and cultural activity of modern Yiddish-speaking Jewish communities in Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union, and the United States from 1890 to 1950. Focuses on the distinct role that Yiddish played in modern Jewish culture during the first half of the 20th century, when the language was the vernacular of the majority of world Jewry. Examines how Yiddish modernism took shape in different places and spheres of activity during a period of extraordinary upheaval.

HBRJD-UA.685: The Holocaust: The Third Reich Engel TR 3:30pm-4:45pm; 19UP 102

Historical investigation of the evolution of Nazi policies toward Jews; of Jewish behavior in the face of those policies; and of the attitudes of other countries, both within and outside the Nazi orbit, for the situation of Jews under the rule of the Third Reich.

HBRJD-UA.712: Israeli Territorial Politics: Between Security & Identity -NEW!  This course will not be offeredregularly. Zellman, Ariel (Fellow, Taub Center for Israel Studies) MW 3:30pm-4:45pm; KJCC BSMT

This course will explore the evolution of and conflict between different concepts of borders in Israeli domestic discourse and their respective impact on Israel's territorial policies and international boundaries. After considering the role of security and identity in shaping broad domestic understandings of territory in Israel, we will examine how these concepts have uniquely influenced Israeli compromise or lack thereof in the Sinai Peninsula, Southern Lebanon, the Gaza Strip, the Golan Heights, Jerusalem, and the West Bank. To accomplish this goal, this course will incorporate a range of scholarly historical and political readings on Israel as well as films and regular student-led discussions on relevant current events.

HBRJD-UA.784: Topics in Jewish History and Lit: Jews in the Muslim World in the Middle Ages  NEW!  This course will not be offeredregularly. Cohen, Mark (Visiting Professor from Princeton) W 2:00pm - 4:45pm; Bronfman Center 3rd Fl

This seminar examines aspects of the history of the Jews in the medieval Islamic world, beginning with the historiographical debate about this contentious subject. The seminar will move from a discussion of the early encounter between Islam and the Jews at the time of the Prophet Muhammad, discussing the Qur’an and other foundational texts, to the legal and actual status of the Jews. We will examine how the famous Cairo Geniza documents illuminate Jewish economic life, and how the realities of economic life affected developments in the halakha. In addition, the course will examine the organization and functions of the Jewish community, with its foundations in the Geonic period.

HRBDJ-UA.948: Topics in Israel Studies: Jews, Arabs and British during the Mandate, 1918 – 1948 - NEW!  This course will not be offered regularly. Hagiladi, Nimrod (Fellow, Taub Center for Israel Studies) TR 2:00pm-3:30pm; 14A Wash Mews, 4th Fl

This course will review the thirty-year history prior to the creation of Israel in 1948. We will try to answer the question: why and how did the Zionists succeed in building a national home and how the relationships between the Jewish and Arab communities were formed. Using primary and secondary sources, it will review social, economic, military and political issues which influenced the development of Jewish settlement, and saw the emergence of Palestinian national identity, the creation of Israel and the Palestinian refugee problem, and the unfolding of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.